Movies of the Week #6 (2017)

Playing catch-up here, this is a short review of the Berlinale movies.

Thursday

  • The Wound (2017): All things considered, The Wound stands as a film that, at its best, conveys a unique poetic restraint. It might not shine all the way through, yet it provides insight into a corner of the world that’s usually left in the dark, tackling some big themes on the way. I would never want to fault someone for being too ambitious, so The Wound gets my recommendation.  7/10 Review Link

Friday

  • Django (2017): Django would have been a much better experience, had it stuck to its music, especially as some of the artist’s work was lost, which is a cause for grief. As another survival movie from the war, it falls flat, especially compared to some of the previously released hard-hitting productions, be they grim or soulful representations of the horror. 5/10 Review Link
  • Barrage (2017): The gorgeous scenery, the restrained performances and some unexpected, but well-suited musical arrangements come together into a coherent experience. It’s going to be an acquired taste, flying close to artistic pretention, because of the pacing. Perhaps what swayed me was the metaphorical use of tennis in framing the relationship of the three women, a sport that’s recognized for the battle one wages not so much with his or her opponent, but with oneself.It’s not an exciting movie, in a sense. Yet there are moments where it manages to connect and resonate, which has the power to outdo mere excitement. So yes, there is some reward at the end of this particular winding road.6/10 Review Link

Saturday

  • The Dinner (2017): I really liked the intensity, the grotesque and obscene affluence entailed by the dinner scenes, even some of the almost derivative monologues. The interpretative freedom made some of the drearier moments worthwhile, but more cohesion and restraint would have transformed The Dinner into something quite special all around. In spite of the backlash it’s being served, Oren Moverman’s film is a worthwhile exploration into how messy holding yourself consistent socially and philosophically can be. 7/10 Review Link
  • No Intenso Agora (2017): This was the best movie I had the chance of watching at the Berlinale. It’s a strange mix of analytical-poetic-social justice, that ultimately leaves a lingering sense of how fleeting and unique some of the most important moments of our lives can be. There is no recipe to it, but Salles clearly indicates that a tempestuously exhibited shared belief, with the deep tributaries of 1968, can change our perception of purpose and existence. I’m not sure I completely agree, but the thesis is compelling and No Intenso Agora is good at expressing it. 8/10 Review Link